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Check Your Tech - Considering the Provenance of Data Used to Build Digital Products and Services

Abstract : Digital products and services are producing unprecedented amounts of data worldwide. These products and services have broad reach and include many users and consumers in the developing world. Once data is collected it is often used to create large and valuable datasets. A lack of data protection regulation in the developing world has led to concerns about digital colonization and a lack of control of their data on the part of citizens in the developing world. The authors of this paper are developing a new digital ethics curriculum for the instruction of computer science students. In this paper we present two case studies we have developed with a focus on data ethics in a developing world context. Each case study is accompanied by a list of specific questions to be used by the instructor to allow students to evaluate the implications of introducing new digital products and services in a developing world context as well as a generic case studies checksheet that allow deeper reflection on the intended and unintended consequences of introducing new technologies.
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Conference papers
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https://hal.inria.fr/hal-03272526
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Submitted on : Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:25:24 PM
Last modification on : Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:33:58 PM
Long-term archiving on: : Wednesday, September 29, 2021 - 7:32:21 PM

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Dympna O’sullivan, Damian Gordon. Check Your Tech - Considering the Provenance of Data Used to Build Digital Products and Services. 16th International Conference on Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries (ICT4D), Jun 2020, Manchester, United Kingdom. pp.195-204, ⟨10.1007/978-3-030-65828-1_16⟩. ⟨hal-03272526⟩

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