Different spatial memory systems are involved in small- and large-scale environments: evidence from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

Abstract : Recent reports show that humans and animals do not acquire information about routes and object locations in the same way. In spatial memory, a specific sub-system is hypothesized to be involved in encoding, storing and recalling navigational information, and it is segregated from the sub-system devoted to small-scale environment. We assessed this hypothesis in a sample of patients treated surgically for intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. We found double dissociations between learning and recall of spatial positions in large space versus small space. These results strongly support the hypothesis that two segregate systems process navigational memory for large-scale environments and spatial memory in small-scale environments.
Type de document :
Article dans une revue
Experimental Brain Research, Springer Verlag, 2010, 206 (2), pp.171-7. 〈10.1007/s00221-010-2234-2〉
Liste complète des métadonnées

https://hal.inria.fr/hal-00805379
Contributeur : Olivier Colliot <>
Soumis le : mercredi 27 mars 2013 - 17:57:58
Dernière modification le : vendredi 31 août 2018 - 08:47:24

Lien texte intégral

Identifiants

Collections

UPMC | ICM | PSL

Citation

L. Piccardi, A. Berthoz, M. Baulac, M. Denos, S. Dupont, et al.. Different spatial memory systems are involved in small- and large-scale environments: evidence from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.. Experimental Brain Research, Springer Verlag, 2010, 206 (2), pp.171-7. 〈10.1007/s00221-010-2234-2〉. 〈hal-00805379〉

Partager

Métriques

Consultations de la notice

116