Training Users' Spatial Abilities to Improve Brain-Computer Interface Performance: A Theoretical Approach

Camille Jeunet 1, 2, *
* Corresponding author
1 Potioc - Popular interaction with 3d content
LaBRI - Laboratoire Bordelais de Recherche en Informatique, Inria Bordeaux - Sud-Ouest
Abstract : —Mental-Imagery based Brain-Computer Interfaces (MI-BCIs) allow their users to send commands to a computer using their brain activity alone (typically measured by ElectroEn-cephaloGraphy-EEG), which is processed while they perform specific mental tasks. While very promising MI-BCIs remain barely used outside laboratories because of the difficulty encountered by users to control them. Indeed, although some users obtain good control performances after training, a substantial proportion remains unable to reliably control an MI-BCI. This huge variability in user performance led the community to look for predictors of MI-BCI control ability. Mainly, neurophysiolog-ical and psychological predictors of MI-BCI performance have been proposed. In this paper, a newly-depicted lever to increase MI-BCI performance is introduced: namely a spatial ability training. The aims of this paper are to clarify the relationship between spatial abilities and mental imagery tasks used in MI-BCI paradigms, and to provide suggestions to include a spatial ability training in MI-BCI training protocols.
Document type :
Conference papers
Complete list of metadatas

Cited literature [30 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://hal.inria.fr/hal-01162411
Contributor : Camille Jeunet <>
Submitted on : Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 2:33:51 PM
Last modification on : Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 1:45:16 AM
Long-term archiving on : Friday, September 11, 2015 - 12:05:59 PM

File

CJCSciencesCognitives_camilleJ...
Files produced by the author(s)

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-01162411, version 1

Citation

Camille Jeunet. Training Users' Spatial Abilities to Improve Brain-Computer Interface Performance: A Theoretical Approach. 9th Conference of Young Researchers in Cognitives Sciences, Jun 2015, Paris, France. ⟨hal-01162411⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

333

Files downloads

248