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Utilizing the Repertory Grid Method to Investigate Learners’ Perceptions of Computer Science Concepts

Abstract : When it comes to studying learners’ perceptions, the most common methods range from arranged questionnaires to carefully structured interviews. While the former are arguably inadequate to understand learners’ perceptions correctly due to the lack of response, the latter lack the ability to flexibly focus on interesting points during the interviews. Since the importance of learners’ perceptions is well-known and many Computer Science concepts are not covered yet, we want to introduce a technique from the field of social psychology and apply it to the domain of Computer Science Education. With our field report on “Utilizing the Repertory Grid Method to Investigate Learners’ Perceptions of Computer Science Concepts” we want to encourage this qualitative approach in this field. We present our application of this method in order to study five 11- to 13-year-old secondary school students’ conceptions of the Internet and the corresponding IT devices. It turns out that the technique is a promising alternative when it comes to studying learners’ perceptions indeed.
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Nils Pancratz, Ira Diethelm. Utilizing the Repertory Grid Method to Investigate Learners’ Perceptions of Computer Science Concepts. 11th IFIP World Conference on Computers in Education (WCCE), Jul 2017, Dublin, Ireland. pp.547-556, ⟨10.1007/978-3-319-74310-3_55⟩. ⟨hal-01762846⟩

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