An attempt to select non-genetic variation in resistance to starvation and reduced chill coma recovery time in Drosophila melanogaster

Abstract : Phenotypic variance is attributed to genetic and non-genetic factors, and only the former are presumed to be inherited and thus suitable for the action of selection. Although increasing amounts of data suggest that non-genetic variability may be inherited, we have limited empirical data in animals. Here, we performed an artificial selection experiment using Drosophila melanogaster inbred lines. We quantified the response to selection for a decrease in chill coma recovery time and an increase in starvation resistance. We observed a weak response to selection in the inbred and outbred lines, with variability across lines. At the end of the selection process, differential expression was detected for some genes associated with epigenetics, the piRNA pathway and canalization functions. As the selection process can disturb the canalization process and increase the phenotypic variance of developmental traits, we also investigated possible effects of the selection process on the number of scutellar bristles, fluctuating asymmetry levels and fitness estimates. These results suggest that, contrary to what was shown in plants, selection of non-genetic variability is not straightforward in Drosophila and appears to be strongly genotype dependent.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadatas

https://hal.inria.fr/hal-01965032
Contributor : Marie-France Sagot <>
Submitted on : Monday, December 24, 2018 - 4:02:19 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, June 26, 2019 - 2:34:03 PM

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Bianca Menezes, Judit Salces-Ortiz, Héloise Muller, Nelly Burlet, Sonia Martinez, et al.. An attempt to select non-genetic variation in resistance to starvation and reduced chill coma recovery time in Drosophila melanogaster. Journal of Experimental Biology, Cambridge University Press, 2018, 221 (23), pp.jeb186254. ⟨10.1242/jeb.186254⟩. ⟨hal-01965032⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

48